Laptop Refresh

October 29th, 2012 by Adrian

Today is a sad (but refreshing) day. Last night I decided to give my MacBook laptop a freshen up. It was getting a bit slow and I only had about 150MB left on the hard drive. So I decided to reformat the hard drive and reinstall OSX, CS6 and my other apps (Chrome, WebStorm, Coda etc). Whilst these were installing I also started to pick at the stickers that I have had on my laptop since 2008. A lot of these stickers have memories attached to them: enjoyable conferences, people I’ve met, inspirational speaker sessions, technologies invested in.

Obviously, once I had started there was no going back. So, with a rag, a bottle of white spirit, some short finger nails and three hours later, I present to you, my refreshed MacBook …

Posted in Adobe, AIR, Conferences and Events, Exhibition, Flex | 1 Comment »

CodeKen 2012 – Online Conference

October 18th, 2012 by Adrian

CodeKen 2012 is an online conference happening on Tuesday 6th November 2012 via Google Hangouts On Air. The speakers include Seb Lee-Delisle talking about his PixelPhones project and Estelle Weyl talking about mobile web development. The schedule can be seen here. The schedule mentions Day 1 and Day 2, but elsewhere on the site it says it is a one day event, so I’m not sure which it is. Anyway, go ahead and register, so that you are notified about the start nearer the time.

Posted in Conferences and Events, CSS, Generative Art, HTML5, Mobile, OpenFrameworks, Physical Computing | No Comments »

Web Platform Docs

October 18th, 2012 by Adrian

Recently a new community initiative was created by the W3C called the Web Platform. The idea is that it will become the ‘go to’ resource for documentation relating to open web technologies. This is supported by a number of large high-profile companies such as Google, Apple (though not listed on the homepage), Microsoft, Adobe, Facebook, HP, Nokia, Mozilla and Opera.

It is currently in Alpha, but in the future it “will have accurate, up-to-date, comprehensive references and tutorials for every part of client-side development and design, with quirks and bugs revealed and explained.

Let’s just hope the content it is not as dry and verbose as the original W3C standards documentation.

Posted in CSS, HTML5, Javascript, Tutorials | No Comments »

The Graphical Web

October 17th, 2012 by Adrian

Last month there was a conference held in Zurich, Switzerland at the Institute of Cartography and Geoinformation called The Graphical Web. It used to be called SVG Open, but this time the name change is to reflect the wider graphical web technologies (SVG, Canvas, CSS transitions, CSS transforms, tooling etc).

You can see what the schedule was here. One of my favourite speakers was there, Joshua Davis.

The main reason for this blog post is to highlight the fact that they recorded all the sessions and have put them online for free. There are some really interesting sessions here. Check them out below …

Here is a full list of the sessions …

Enjoy!

Posted in Conferences and Events, CSS, Design, Generative Art, HTML5, Infographics, Presentation, SVG | No Comments »

Resonate 2013

October 15th, 2012 by Adrian

Another conference coming up (next year) that looks interesting is Resonate. It is taking place in Belgrade, Serbia and is on from 21st – 23rd March 2013. Tickets go on sale on Tuesday 23rd October 2012 and only cost €55 if you get in there early.

The current list of speakers includes (among others) …

  • Casey Reas
  • Golan Levin
  • Andreas Müller
  • Kyle McDonald
  • Memo Akten

The full website for the conference launches on 6th November 2012.

Follow the organisers on Twitter here.

Posted in Conferences and Events, Generative Art, Infographics, Interaction, OpenFrameworks, Physical Computing, Processing | No Comments »

Push Conference 2012

October 15th, 2012 by Adrian

I’ve just come across an awesome conference happening in Munich, Germany on 23rd & 24th November 2012. It’s called the Push Conference, and is focussed on User Experience (Sold Out) and Interactive Arts. I’m particularly interested in the sessions by some of the people on the second day …

There are still tickets available for day two (Interactive Arts) and they are currently only € 89.00

Posted in Conferences and Events, Generative Art, Interaction, OpenFrameworks, Physical Computing, Processing | No Comments »

HTML, CSS & JS Online Code Editors/Playgrounds

October 10th, 2012 by Adrian

Over the last year or so there has been increase in the number of online HTML, CSS & JS editors. These are usually intended to demo small snippets of code that can be saved and shared. The feature sets of each service differ slightly, so you may need to try a few before you find the one that suits your specific requirements. Here are a few to get you started (with the most popular/fully-featured near the top). Many of these are based on CodeMirror or ACE.


jsFiddle – This is probably the most popular of these type of tools. It is pretty comprehensive and allows you to save and share your code. It includes HTML, CSS and JavaScript. You can choose from a wide range of pre-defined JavaScript frameworks, and you can also link to your own if it is not listed. It supports SCSS (Sass 3) and CoffeeScript if you are into those. You can choose from a variety of DTDs and modify the <body> tag (if needed). It has buttons for tidying up your code and JSLint support is included. The documentation is pretty comprehensive and the UI is nice and clean and easy to use. There is no code completion or code hinting as you type and your code doesn’t automatically run (you have to click the ‘Run’ button, or use the keyboard shortcut, to see your results). jsFiddle’s Twitter account is here.


JS Bin – This was created by Remy Sharp and is gaining in popularity. By default it has shortcuts to a huge list of JavaScript libraries, which you can include in your code. It supports many different flavours of HTML, CSS and JavaScript meta-languages (templating) like Markdown, Jade, LESS, Stylus, CoffeeScript, Processing, Traceur and TypeScript (Zen Coding is also supported). It has in in-built Console panel and the Output panel is automatically updated as you type. It automatically saves your code and there are a variety of sharing options. JavaScript error checking is provided via JSHint. A nice simple and clean tool, but again, no code completion or code hinting. A couple of great features it does have though is called Codecast (which enables people to watch as you type) and and Remote Rendering (which can be used to view your output on multiple devices in realtime). The documentation and help is pretty good too and the editor can be customised in great detail. Remy has done a fantastic job with this and he is always adding new and improved features. Follow JS Bin on Twitter.


Codepen – This tool was co-created by Mr CSS-Tricks (Chris Coyier) himself. It has a nice clean and well presented UI and the homepage is great for seeing other people’s demos (picked by the staff, or ranked as ‘popular’ or ‘recent’). The sharing and embedding options are good and forking other people’s projects is really easy (you can also see various Stats and Comments too). You can choose from a selection of colour schemes for the code editor (and select from three different fonts). Like jsFiddle and JS Bin, there is support for a variety of templating tools like HAML, Markdown, Slim, LESS, SCSS, SASS and CoffeeScript. It has built-in support for CSS Normalize, CSS Reset-prefix-free and Modernizr, and shortcuts to the latest versions of a few of the most popular JavaScript libraries. I think the strongest feature of this site is the way other people’s demos are showcased and easily accessible. This seems to be where all the cool kids hang out!


Dabblet – This tool was created by the very talented Lea Verou (who now works for the W3C), (check out her ‘Projects‘ page). This tool is focused on HTML and CSS (not JavaScript) and provides syntax highlighting and realtime updates. I particularly like the popup panels for CSS colors, gradients,  pixel dimensions, degrees and seconds. Plus the easy slider to increase the font size of the text in your code editor is handy. It has support for -prefix-free built in (it was created by Lea too) and is tightly integrated with github:gist. dabblet itself is open source and made available on github.


HTML5 Rocks Playground – This playground is really intended to show predefined examples of HTML5 code. You can’t use it to write your own snippets that can be saved and shared. But, for seeing how to do things (by the experts) in HTML, CSS, JavaScript this site is really great. Worth bookmarking.

jsdo.it

jsdo.it is a Japanese online playground that has some very talented individuals using it. It is the sister site to the Flash AS3 online playground wonderfl. It pushes other peoples creations to the homepage (which is good for inspiration) and allows you to fork their code and modify it as you like. There are categories too (such as Application, User Interface, CSS, Game etc) which is useful. You can ‘Fav’ other peoples creations and you can ‘Follow’ them too (like you can on Codepen).


Tinkerbin – This editor has the basic features (separate panels for HTML, CSS, JavaScript and Output, but not resizable by dragging) and support for HAML, SCSS, SASS, LESS and CoffeeScript. You can save your snippets (each save is assigned it’s own unique short URL which you can pass on to other people) but it is pretty limited and doesn’t have some of the advanced features that jsFiddle, JS Bin and Codepen have.


Fiddle Salad – With this editor, you choose your coding style up-front. You are presented with the options of HTML (or HAML, Zen Coding, Markdown, CoffeeCup, Jade), CSS (or LESS, SCSS, SASS, Stylus), JavaScript (or CoffeeScript, Python, Roy), and then you hit the ‘Go’ button to start. The interface looks pretty busy (and not as clean as some of the other tolls listed above), but it does include a handy ‘Documentation’ panel which provides you with links to W3C’s CSS and HTML documentation, as well as jQuery (and the templating engines mentioned). Also, all the UI panels can be moved and resized which is pretty handy. Once you dig a little deeper you’ll realise that a lot of time and effort has gone into making this quite a fully featured tool. It has several different frameworks and libraries for you to choose from and select for import. It also has a number of ‘Tools’ such as validation and beautify tools (though some of these are just links to external websites). One thing that this has that some of the other tools don’t is code completion and code hinting (very useful in CSS). Overall I think this tool shows promise, but at the time of writing it doesn’t quite have the polish of jsFiddleJS Bin or Codepen.


ztxt – This is open source and available on github (thanks to Zevan Rosser). There is not a hosted version of this, the intention is that you download a copy of ztxt and then either run it locally using MAMP (or WAMP), or you host it on your own live webserver. I like the way that it can be used locally and allows access to your local filesystem. More information on ztxt can be seen on YouTube here.


Tinker – This is fairly bare-bones, but it does have a clean UI (with draggable editing areas) and offers syntax highlighting and saving (to a unique short URL). Clutter-free and to the point. It is open source and available to download from github (thanks to Chiel Kunkels).


CSS Desk – Created by Josh Pyles, this editor is for HTML and CSS only (no separate JavaScript). It has syntax highlighting, line numbers and realtime output. I like the fact that it allows you to easily save your edit out as a downloadable HTML file. You can save your snippet to a unique short URL for sharing. Minimal, but functional for CSS demos.


Liveweave – Created by Amit Sen, this tool requires you to have all your CSS and JavaScript in the HTML page (there is not separate panels like the other editors). It allows you to save your page as a downloadable HTML file which is handy. But for me, the killer feature (which most of the other editors don’t have) is auto-completion and code completion, a very useful addition (who can possibly remember all those CSS attributes and values?)


Cssizer – This tool (built by David Morrow) is also designed for HTML and CSS (not JavaScript) and has a limited feature set. However it does have syntax highlighting, realtime preview, and saving of snippets to a unique short URL (which get saved for you if you login using Twitter). You can also validate your code with an automated link to W3C. It is also open source and available to download from github.


pastebin.me – Created by Dale Harvey as a personal project, this tool is pretty bare-bones. A single editing panel with a non-realtime output panel. No syntax highlighting or features that the other editor have. It is available to download from github.


Html5Snippet – This is quite a slick editor with a number of saving and sharing features. I like the way you can download your code as separate files (.html .css .js) in a ZIP file. The editor also includes a huge list of predefined JavaScript frameworks and libraries. You can follow Html5Snippet on Twitter here.


Google Code Playground – This is similar to the HTML5 Rocks Playground, in that it is intended to demonstrate pre-written chunks of code (not as an editor for you to create your own and save) that you can tweak to see the results. The great thing about this is that it is chock-full of fantastic examples of accessing Google APIs, ranging from Google Translate and Google Calendar, through to Google Search, Maps and YouTube. If you are planning on using a Google API, it is worth checking here first to see if there is an example that will help. The link to the documentation is context sensitive, depending on what type of example you are viewing at the time.


TheCodePlayer – At the time of writing this site doesn’t allow you to create your own snippets and save them. But it does allow to play back the creation of their example HTML, CSS and JavaScript examples, which is very nice. It looks like in the future they are planning on opening the editor up for public use, to allow you to contribute your examples. I’d say ‘Keep an eye on this one’. Follow their Twitter stream here.

That pretty much wraps it up for now. I’m sure there are a bunch of other ones I’ve missed off this list (eg. Plunker), let me know in the comments if there is one I should take a look at. Enjoy!

Posted in CSS, HTML, HTML5, Javascript, Sample Code, Tool | 1 Comment »

Adobe Edge Web Fonts – Preview

October 3rd, 2012 by Adrian

Sample of the acme font

I have put together a webpage that previews all the (currently available) Adobe Edge Web Fonts.

You can view ALL the fonts here.

Note: The JavaScript may take a few seconds to load.

Posted in Adobe, Edge Animate, Fonts, HTML5, Javascript | No Comments »

Leap Motion – Amazing gesture movement detection

May 29th, 2012 by Adrian

Leap Motion

Today I came across a new device which takes the concept of the Microsoft Kinect to the next level. It is called the Leap and it has been developed by a San Francisco company called Leap Motion. It works in a similar way to the Kinect, but it is a lot more acurate, allowing you to interact with your computer using individual finger movements. They claim it is “200 times more accurate than anything else on the market” and it can “track your movements down to a 1/100th of a millimeter”. That seriously impressive stuff! Plus, it maps everything in 3D space and the device itself is only the size of a small iPod and plugs into any USB port.

Check our their video on YouTube ..

Posted in Gadgets, Interaction, Physical Computing | No Comments »

GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) v12 – Now supporting JS

May 16th, 2012 by Adrian

GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) v12

Mr Jack “Green Sock” Doyle has just released version 12 of his GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) for Flash AS2 and AS3, but the big announcement is that it now supports JavaScript too!

This is awesome news, and the API for JavaScript is the same as we have been using all these years for Flash projects. Plus the performance is amazing! I’ve just quickly run a few tests on my computer and it is way faster than jQuery, YUI 3, MooTools and Zepto. Try running the speed test yourself to see just how fast it is. I’ll post some speed test figures here soon.

Jack has managed to include TweenLite, TweenMax, TimelineLite, and TimelineMax in to the JavaScript version, plus there is also a new CSSPlugin that enables css-related animations.

There have also been some other general improvements, changes and optimisations throughout the platform.

Great work Jack. If you use this library in your work why not help Jack to continue working on it by becoming a Club GreenSock member?

Posted in Actionscript 1.0 & 2.0, ActionScript 3.0, Animation, Javascript, Tweening | No Comments »

Adobe Edge – Preview 6 now available

May 14th, 2012 by Adrian

Adobe Edge logo

On Friday Adobe released Edge (Preview 6) on Adobe Labs. This latest version includes the following updates:

  • Built-in lessons: First-timers and newbies, rejoice! We have six new tutorials built right into Edge, to help new users get familiar with the basics.
  • Coding: A new code panel gives you a complete view of the actions code in your project, and the code editor has a new full code mode.
  • Publishing: Easily import your projects into Adobe’s Digital Publishing Suite with InDesign CS6, or Apple iBooks author. We also have a new Static HTML Markup feature for SEO benefits, and Google Chrome Frame support for better fidelity on older browsers.
  • Symbols: You can now copy/paste and import/export symbols from one project to another.
  • Languages: Edge is now available in French, German, Japanese, Italian, and Spanish. Just go to the ‘Help’ menu to change it.
  • Other cool stuff: The Preview in Browser function is now compatible with Adobe Shadow, auto-keyframe mode has been improved, editable time codes are back, and so much more to make Edge more efficient.

Download the latest version here.

Here are some useful links to help get you up-to-speed …

Adobe Edge Preview Microsite
http://edge.adobe.com/whatisedge.html

Edge Team Blog
http://blogs.adobe.com/edge/

A version by version list of new features
http://edge.adobe.com/features.html

Mark Anders on AdobeTV – Introducing Edge Preview 6
http://tv.adobe.com/watch/adobe-edge-preview/introducing-edge-preview-6/

Mark Anders on AdobeTV – Getting Started with Adobe Edge
http://tv.adobe.com/watch/adobe-edge-preview/getting-started-with-adobe-edge/

Adobe Edge on Labs
http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/edge/

Adobe Edge Twitter Feed
http://twitter.com/#!/adobeedge

Edge Preview Discussion Forum
http://forums.adobe.com/community/labs/edge/

Adobe Edge Runtime API
http://www.adobe.com/go/edge_api_016_en

Joseph Labrecque’s Video Tutorials
http://inflagrantedelicto.memoryspiral.com/2012/05/adobe-edge-preview-6-released/

Other Resources
http://edge.adobe.com/resources.html

Posted in Adobe, Animation, Edge Animate, HTML5, Javascript | No Comments »

Starling 1.1 has been released

May 9th, 2012 by Adrian

Starling logo

Starling (the hardware accelerated 2D framework for Flash using Stage3D) has been updated to version 1.1.

Some of the new features include …

  • Support for Multi-Resolution Development: Create your game for just one resolution and deploy it to any screen out there, simply by providing different sets of textures.
  • Use Blend Modes for interesting optical effects, without any sacrifices on performance.
  • Enjoy a Performance Improvement on the 1st Generation iPad and comparable devices. Benchmark results skyrocketed by 500%!
  • Display Live Statistics (framerate, memory consumption) through the new “showStats” feature.
  • Profit from numerous bugfixes and performance improvements throughout the code base.

You can download the latest version from here …

http://gamua.com/starling/download/

If you are looking for some useful resources to get started, check these links out …

Posted in ActionScript 3.0, AIR, Flash, Starling, Tutorials | No Comments »

Back from MAX Event in London, Paris and Berlin

September 27th, 2011 by Adrian

Join Adobe for a day of news, views and product deep dives fresh from MAX in LA. If you couldn’t make it to Los Angeles then this is your chance to be the first in Europe to see all the latest product demos around Flash, Flex, AIR, Stage 3D and more. Meet the evangelists, ask your question and get ready to have some fun.

Paris 27 October 2011
Don’t miss Back From Max Paris on October 27th 2011. Come and discover the latest news from Adobe MAX around multiplatform development for iOS, Android, PlayBook and others. Listen to our Evangelism team talks on Flash, Flex, HTML5, AIR, Multiplattform Apps, -Gaming and -Video!

Berlin 28 October 2011
Adobe Tech Summit 2011 Berlin will give you more than 16 hours of free power seminars and workshops on HTML5, Flash, Flex, AIR, Multiplattform Apps, -Gaming and -Video! You’ll come away from this day inspired and informed with all the news fresh from Adobe MAX.

London 02 November 2011
Join us for a half day at London’s Barbican Centre where you’ll get all the news from Adobe MAX in our keynote followed by two technical tracks. One track will have a more enterprise focus with sessions onFlex, AIR and mobile. Whilst the second will focus on gaming and flash technologies.

The agenda for each event can be viewed on their respective pages. Just click on the links above to find out more and register.

Posted in Adobe, Conferences and Events | No Comments »

Adobe MAX 2011 Keynote Webcast

September 27th, 2011 by Adrian

Adobe MAX 2011 starts next week (October 1st – 5th) in Los Angeles. If you are not going, don’t dispair, you can watch the keynotes online. Just make sure you register online beforehand. Do it now!

Day 1 – Creativity unleashed
Date: Monday, October 3, 2011
Time: 9:30 am – 11:30 am (5:30 pm – 7:30 pm London time)
Duration: 120 minutes
Description: Join Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch and guests to learn how Adobe is transforming the creative process across mobile devices, personal computers, and the cloud.

Day 2 – Creating the very best user experiences
Date: Tuesday, October 4, 2011
Time: 10 am – 11:30 am (6:00 pm – 7:30 pm London time)
Duration: 90 minutes
Description: Join us as we explore the best solutions for delivering highly expressive and usable experiences, both in the browser and as apps. We’ll look at a variety of technologies and products, highlighting current opportunities, and peering into the not-so-distant future.

Posted in Adobe, Conferences and Events, Presentation, Video | No Comments »

Book Review: Flash Development for Android Cookbook

September 22nd, 2011 by Adrian

Flash Development for Android Cookbook front cover

Title: Flash Development for Android Cookbook
Author: Joseph Labrecque
Publisher: Packt Publishing
Released: June 2011
Website link: http://goo.gl/icJsk
Amazon link: http://goo.gl/TGBv5

For any Flash or Flex developer looking to create applications for mobile (in particular Android ones) then this is a great book to have on your desk! Weighing in at 372 pages, there is a lot of content in there just waiting for you to try out and play with.

First things first, this is a Cookbook. It’s not a reference title listing every single API and documenting every single class available. Though to be honest, it seems to cover most of the new AIR for Android features. The idea behind a Cookbook is to provide you with a selection of ‘recipes’ or common tasks, and then explain how to go about solving them in a clear and concise way. This book does this brilliantly. It is the sort of book you can dib into when you have a specific thing to get done in your app and you’re not sure where to start. Having said that, I basically read it from cover to cover, and still found it very informative and enjoyable.

The book is broken up into the following 11 chapters …

  • Chapter 1: Getting Ready to Work with Android: Development Environment and Project Setup (10 recipes)
  • Chapter 2: Interaction Experience: Multitouch, Gestures, and Other Input (13 recipes)
  • Chapter 3: Movement through Space: Accelerometer and Geolocation Sensors (9 recipes)
  • Chapter 4: Visual and Audio Input: Camera and Microphone Access (6 recipes)
  • Chapter 5: Rich Media Presentation: Working with Images, Video, and Audio (7 recipes)
  • Chapter 6: Structural Adaptation: Handling Device Layout and Scaling (12 recipes)
  • Chapter 7: Native Interaction: StageWebView and URI Handlers (10 recipes)
  • Chapter 8: Abundant Access: File System and Local Database (7 recipes)
  • Chapter 9: Manifest Assurance: Security and Android Permissions (6 recipes)
  • Chapter 10: Avoiding Problems: Debugging and Resource Considerations (6 recipes)
  • Chapter 11: Final Considerations: Application Compilation and Distribution (10 recipes)

All these chapter are equally important and cover a wide range of features, but which ones you’ll actually need to use will depend on your project and what you are trying to achieve. Although the title of this book specifies Android, most of the code in this book will work equally well on iOS devices and the BlackBerry PlayBook. That’s the joy of developing using ActionScript and AIR! :-)

I was particularly pleased to see that nearly all the code examples were IDE agnostic and didn’t tie you in to the Flex framework. They concentrated on using pure ActionScript in whatever IDE you feel comfortable working in. In fact, Joseph even went to the trouble of explaining any IDE specific stuff using example in Flash Pro CS5.5, Flash Builder 4.5 and FDT 4.1.

Once you have had a flick through at some of the examples it quickly becomes clear that Adobe have done a really good job at providing a consistent and logical API for achieving all these new mobile specific things. And this book does a great job of demystifying it all.

My one criticism would be that there is quite a lot of repetitive code (about 14 lines) in each example, where Joseph sets up an output textfield (and accompanying textformat) for demonstration purposes. But I guess I noticed it more because I was reading the book straight through (not how it was intended to be read). At least this way, each ‘recipe’ or example is self contained and provides everything you need to get you up and running easily.

I did notice a few errors here and there (code and layout), but nothing too serious that would cause you issues.

I’d thoroughly recommend this title to anyone who is interested in creating mobile apps for either Android, iOS or PlayBook using AIR and ActionScript.

Sample Chaper
Chapter 4 - Visual and Audio Input: Camera and Microphone Access can be downloaded as a free PDF file here.

Related books by other authors and publishers include:

Posted in AIR, Android, Books, Mobile | No Comments »

Google Chrome advert man must be very confused @#*%£!

June 6th, 2011 by Adrian

Chrome

You may have noticed recently that Google have been advertising their Chrome browser on TV. The advert I saw showed a chap called Edward Lewis (fictional I presume) sending emails to his newly born daughter, Hollie. All very cute and sentimental, ahhhh. If you didn’t see it you can watch it on YouTube here.

If you can see this, then you might need a Flash Player upgrade or you need to install Flash Player if it's missing. Get Flash Player from Adobe.

But you have to feel sorry for poor Mr Lewis (who is doing his best to provide his little girl with a valuable commentary of her early years), because at every turn Google are out to mess with his mind!

First of all he creates a new gMail account for Hollie with the username ‘dear.hollie’, only to find she already has 32 emails waiting for her in her inbox!

dear.hollie@gmail.com

Secondly, he has been busy recording special moments of Hollie on his trust camcorder and diligently uploading them to YouTube for her to watch when she is older. We see him logged in to YouTube as ‘Edwardlewis599′ and he has already uploaded 11 clips.

Edwardlewis599 YouTube account

But, when we visit his YouTube page ALL his videos have been removed!!

Edwardlewis599 has no videos available.

Thirdly, at 42 seconds in, we see Mr Lewis trying to find where he needs to take his princess for her ‘First Day At School’. Obviously, not wanting to turn up at the wrong place he does a search using the Chrome browser address bar for ‘Park Road Primary School’.

Park Road Primary School

Luckily for Mr Lewis, the school he is looking for is top of the Google search results. However, for us, we find four different Park Road Primary Schools

And the school that Mr Lewis finds has obviously been taken in to special measures and then closed by OFSTED! Poor Hollie.

But to be honest, it’s lucky he ever found the school on her first day anyway. As Google Maps tells him that the school is located at 10 Park Road, NW4 84W.

Google Map

Anyone that lives in the NW4 postcode area of London will be able to tell you that they live in Hendon, near the end of the M1 motorway, not Ealing, which is where Google Maps is trying to take him.

Weymouth Ave

In fact, Google Maps doesn’t take poor Edward to Park Road at all. It takes him to Weymouth Ave in Ealing, a whole 9.2 miles (21 minutes) away. Me thinks Hollie is going to be late!

(Interestingly, there is also a Weymouth Ave in Barnet, just north of Hendon.)

A quick drag of the little yellow man on to the map reveals what the school looks like …

Hollie's new school

Very impressive!!!

Whereas, on Street Map what we see is …

Weymouth Ave on Street Map

Not quite as impressive. :-(

Maybe Hollie is actually meant to go to Little Ealing Primary School instead, there has just been an administrative error somewhere along the line …

Little Ealing Primary School

Ok, let’s suspend disbelief for a little while longer and assume Mr Lewis knows where he has to take his daughter.

Next we see a lovely photo of lovely Hollie with all her school bags ready to go. At the top we can see that he has geotagged the photo with the latitude and longitude …

Hollie in geotagged photo

http://maps.google.co.uk/?ll=53.800651,-4.064941

Let’s find out where Edward and Hollie Lewis live. Yikes! They live in the middle of the Irish Sea!

The Irish Sea

That’s 223 miles away (according to Google Earth) as the crow flies.

I definitely think she is going to be late now!

All he needs now is Google Teleporter to get her there for registration.

 

Posted in Google | 13 Comments »

Creative Coding Podcast

March 4th, 2011 by Adrian

Creative Coding Podcast

A new podcast has been brought to my attention called the Creative Coding Podcast.

Hosted by Seb Lee-Delisle and Iain Lobb, two names I’m sure you will recognise from the UK Flash scene.

They will be discussing the ins-and-outs of programming for visual and creative applications. The first episode only went out on 30th January 2011, so it is still early days. Give them your support by subscribing in iTunes now.

Here are direct links to the three episodes so far …

Enjoy!

UPDATE – October 29th 2012 – New episodes have been added below …

Posted in ActionScript 3.0, Adobe, AIR, Android, Augmented Reality, BlackBerry, Flash, Flash Catalyst, Flex, Game, Generative Art, Infographics, iPhone, Mobile, OpenFrameworks, Papervision 3D, Physical Computing, Podcast, Processing, Websites | 2 Comments »

Adobe Wave Discontinued

March 4th, 2011 by Adrian

Adobe Wave Discontinued

This morning I received an email from Adobe saying that Adobe Wave is to be discontinued. It read as follows …

“Date: Thu, 3 Mar 2011 14:05:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Adobe Wave Discontinuation

Thank you for your participation in the Adobe Wave beta program on Adobe Labs. Adobe Labs provides us with an environment to release exciting, innovative technology to our community and gather feedback. Sometimes these technologies turn into shipping products and other times they provide valuable learning that is applied across our portfolio of products. We have decided not to continue development of Adobe Wave. As it is an online service, it will cease to function once the Adobe Wave servers are shut down, which will happen on April 15, 2011. We appreciate your understanding and encourage you to use this time to find an alternative solution for your needs. Thank you again for your use of Adobe Labs and we look forward to your participation in future beta programs.

Best,
Adobe Wave Team”

Adobe Wave was a desktop alert and notification application/system, that allowed users to send messages out to subscribers (hmmm, sounds a bit like Twitter doesn’t it?). I signed up to the program in August 2009 and then never used it. I think discontinuing this product is a good thing, it couldn’t compete with Twitter and Adobe are better off focusing their energies elsewhere.

Posted in Adobe | 1 Comment »

Eyeo Festival has an amazing line-up of speakers

March 2nd, 2011 by Adrian

Eyeo Festival

I have just found about the Eyeo Festival, and WOW, what an amazing line-up of speakers there is!!

Here are just a few names from the speaker list

The event is lasts for three days, is on from June 27th to 29th 2011 and is being held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, US.

The venue is the McNamara Alumni Center, and looks like a pretty amazing building. Check the images of it here.

Visit the official website to find out more information.

Posted in Conferences and Events, Design, Generative Art, Infographics, OpenFrameworks, Physical Computing, Processing | No Comments »

Win Your Wish List with O’Reilly

January 27th, 2011 by Adrian

O'Reilly Books and Videos

O’Reilly are running a competition to ‘Win Your Wish List‘. Post your list on your blog and be in with a chance of winning the whole lot. You have until Tuesday 22nd February.

Here is my list (in no particular order) …

Fingers crossed!

Posted in Books | No Comments »

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